Philadelphia Subway Map Based Upon A. Merritt Taylor’s Proposals (1913-1915)

Back in 2002, while on medical leave, I attempted to abstract and post online the annual reports of the Philadelphia Department of City Transit. I managed to get the first two years up. Shortly thereafter this map arrived in my PhilaU inbox. A fellow on the Main Line, whose name I have long forgotten, made this for my website. The map is, mostly, based on the original 1913 plan. He added the airport connection “just because.” Anyway, enjoy.

Philadelphia Rapid Transit System

3 thoughts on “Philadelphia Subway Map Based Upon A. Merritt Taylor’s Proposals (1913-1915)

  1. Mr james

    We need the plans of 1913 to be in 2016 . The city and the state need to get off of their back side and easy the traffic the Philadelphia . The broad st line would take 50 percent of traffic off of the Schuylkill expressway . We as Philadelphia tax payers need the expansion of the Broad Street line to the following areas that have been labeled out in the diagrams . If there is anyone who can help get these plans moved forward please help the city of Philadelphia.

    Reply
    1. Riley Roberts

      One, subway line tunnels exist at Spring Garden street near the Art Museum, Ridge Avenue, and Roosevelt Avenue. Additionally, the Subway-Surface lines could easily be converted to subways because they have the same gauge as the Broad street line, and would continue under ground via Woodland, and Lancaster Avenues into Delaware County as subways, while the surface cars would be more local. Additional proposed subway lines could be added via a chunnel machine and many of these other proposed would likely be up and running by 2022. (On average they chunk out about 200 feet per day, which would average out to a mile per month). So, for example, the “Waterfront” line above is possible by wider lanes with I-95. This could be completed in likely 2 or 3 years. This proposal could add either subways or elevated lines from the proposed map, then it could be completed in maybe 5-10 years.

      Reply

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